Paycheck Protection Program Loan Toolkit

This loan program is focused on businesses, nonprofits, veterans organizations and Tribal businesses with not more than 500 employees. The PPP loans are administered under the Small Business Administration Section 7(a) loan programs. The loans will be issued and administered by local lenders. [More]

Estate planning in your 20s and 30s

People in their twenties and thirties, regardless of other life circumstance--like whether they have children--typically have social media accounts. You may not want your social media accounts to live on in perpetuity while the likelihood of being hacked increases over time. You may want your family to be able to access photographs of you on digital platforms and you may not. You may rather have a friend filter out the things that are appropriate for family before deleting your account. [More]

Insurance coverage and COVID-19 losses

Insureds should be aware that insurance companies will likely receive a massive number of COVID-19 claims. Insureds should expect insurers to apply heightened scrutiny to COVID-19 claims, require strict compliance with policy conditions, narrowly interpret coverage and exclusions under the policy to exclude COVID-19 claims, and specifically exclude COVID-19 claims from policies during renewal. [More]

Arkansas small businesses now eligible for Economic Disaster Loans

A pandemic can strain a small business's financial capacity to make payroll, maintain inventory, and respond to sudden drops in the market. The United States Small Business Administration (“SBA”) works with state governors to provide loans to support small businesses in times of economic disaster. A small business, small agricultural cooperative, small business engaged in aquaculture, or private non-profit organization may borrow up to $2 million for economic injury caused by COVID-19. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses and 2.75% for non-profits. [More]

Employers and Coronavirus

The CDC has provided interim guidance for businesses and employers to plan and respond to COVID-19.[5] The CDC will update the interim guidance as needed so employers should periodically check the CDC website for new information.

Sick employees should be actively encouraged to stay home. Employees who have symptoms of acute respiratory illness are recommended to stay home and not come to work until they are free of fever (100.4° F or greater using an oral thermometer), signs of a fever, and any other symptoms for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing or other symptom-altering medicines. Employees should notify their supervisor and stay home if they are sick. [More]