Arkansas small businesses now eligible for Economic Disaster Loans

A pandemic can strain a small business's financial capacity to make payroll, maintain inventory, and respond to sudden drops in the market. The United States Small Business Administration (“SBA”) works with state governors to provide loans to support small businesses in times of economic disaster. A small business, small agricultural cooperative, small business engaged in aquaculture, or private non-profit organization may borrow up to $2 million for economic injury caused by COVID-19. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses and 2.75% for non-profits. [More]

What the Families First Coronavirus Response Act means for your business

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”) into law on March 18, 2020, and it takes effect no later than April 2, 2020—15 days from enactment. The law significantly increases paid leave requirements on employers with fewer than 500 employees and then offsets that burden with payroll tax credits. [More]

Matthew Boch appointed to the Board of the National Association of State Bar Tax Sections (NASBTS)

DDH attorney Matt Boch, who is the current Chair of the Arkansas Bar Association Section of Taxation, has been appointed to the board of the National Association of State Bar Tax Sections (NASBTS). NASBTS is a national organization that supports state bar tax sections and tax lawyers. It provides a platform for sharing trends and best practices for state tax bars as well as in-depth coverage of federal and state and local tax topics. [More]

Employers and Coronavirus

The CDC has provided interim guidance for businesses and employers to plan and respond to COVID-19.[5] The CDC will update the interim guidance as needed so employers should periodically check the CDC website for new information.

Sick employees should be actively encouraged to stay home. Employees who have symptoms of acute respiratory illness are recommended to stay home and not come to work until they are free of fever (100.4° F or greater using an oral thermometer), signs of a fever, and any other symptoms for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing or other symptom-altering medicines. Employees should notify their supervisor and stay home if they are sick. [More]